anti-social networking

Much is written about teens abandoning social networks like Facebook and Twitter but not a huge amount on why.  Ever wondered why your kids or niece / nephew’s phone never stops beeping yet they rarely post anywhere?

It’s all about the anti-social networking. …

When my digital media students are sitting, waiting for class to start, and staring at their phones, they are not checking Facebook. They’re not checking Instagram or Pinterest or Twitter. No, they’re catching up on the news of the day by checking out their friends’ Stories on Snapchat, chatting in Facebook Messenger or checking in with their friends in a group text. If the time drags, they might switch to Instagram to see what the brands they love are posting, or check in with Twitter for a laugh at some celebrity tweets. But, they tell me, most of the time they eschew the public square of social media for more intimate options.

Full article from Quartz here.


Digital detox? Is it ever a good idea?

I’m off Facebook (and whatsapp). People who know me will know this is probably a bit hard for me to do as I rely on it heavily. It’s my primary messaging app, my school/PTA system, my newsreader, how I update family on our lives, crucial to elements of my work and my personal photo library/log for the kids…and on and on.

Over the past few years I’ve used it more than twitter and have all valued the feedback and interaction there much higher than on other channels.

But you can have too much of a good thing, right?

Maybe it’s my current state of mind or maybe it’s the recent election but I found myself veering between annoyance and self censorship on the platform. I wasn’t happy with either so for now, I’m off it.

Back here though where I hope to use the blog as a way to process some of the current things I am facing and struggling with as a working parent in a busy agency role.

More anon.

does worklife balance exist?

According to Jack Welch, former CEO GE last week in the WSJ, it is officially dead. However, i think the problems arise when people try to compartmentalise their work and their home lives.  Wireless data has meant we can be contacted/stay in touch on the move.  Great, whereas once we would have been working til 10pm, we are now sat on the sofa with our partners, watching TV, tweeting with friends and sporadically checking if the email we were waiting for at 6pm has come in yet.  What’s changed?


If anything the lines have been blurred but that isn’t a bad thing necessarily as long as you remember to switch off.  I had a colleague ask me if I had got the plan they sent me Fri night (I don’t work Fridays) and this was Monday….I hadn’t. I didn’t check email all weekend.  I had family down, had a great time and would encourage you to do the same when you can. You’re much more use at work when you are relaxed and refreshed.

I think instead of talking about worklife balance, we need to talk about worklife discipline.  Only you can decide if your kid’s sports day is more important than a client meeting…or if your holiday is more important than knowing what is going on in the office 24/7. Prioritisation is an essential skill….and it is a skill that you’ll continually need to hone.  If you have kids, it changes.  If a parent falls ill, it changes. You get the picture….

People talk about worklife balance as something a company can give you….I believe it is something you must build yourself. The company can provide flexibility but only you know what’s really important each day.

us now, me later

There are times when I hate not living in London and yesterday was one of them. Us Now was screening at the RSA and I really wanted to see it.  Here is a trailer. Blurb from the makers here too.

The film looks at the power of mass
collaboration, government and the internet and features interviews and clips from the likes of Clay Shirky – author of Here Comes Everybody and Matthew Taylor – chief exec of the RSA.

Just signed up to go and see it at NESTA next week so will post my thoughts then.